Thursday, December 29, 2016

Story of the World - Revised Version Changes - Chapters 1 - 5

Below is a list of the substantive changes I found made in the Revised version of Story of the World, Volume 1 for  Chapters 1 -5.   Minor changes such as splitting up paragraphs are not noted, nor are picture changes.  There may be other changes I didn't notice as well.  For a full list of changes by chapter click hereClick here to view all my Story of the World posts.

Chapter 1 - Section 2:  The First Nomads Become Farmers
There were a few semi-substantive changes/additions, in addition to a few minor wording changes (not mentioned here).

CHANGE 1:

Original - Paragraph 1 (last sentence)

And it was called "fertile" because plenty of rich grass, wild barley, and wild wheat grew there.

Revised - Paragraph 2
And it was called fertile because two rivers, called the Tigris and Euphrates, ran through it.  Rich grass, wild barley, and wild wheat grew in the damp soil of the river banks.

CHANGE 2:  

Original - Paragraph 3

Nomads who settled in the Fertile Crescent had to feed themselves without wandering around to find wild leaves, nuts and berries. Soon the people who lived in the Fertile Crescent discovered that wheat or barley seeds, dropped onto the ground, grew into new plants.  They found out that these plants needed extra water to flourish.  The land near the rivers was damp enough to make growing easy, but further away, the land was dry for much of the year.  So the new farmers learned to dig canals from the river out into their fields.  That way, even if it did not rain, they could bring water to their crops.

Revised - Paragraph 4-5
Nomads who settled in the Fertile Crescent couldn't just pick leaves, nuts, and berries to eat.  Soon they would run out of wild plants to harvest.  Instead, they had to begin to plant grain for themselves.  The nomads of the Fertile Crescent were turning into farmers.

These new fields of grain needed extra water to flourish.  The land near the rivers was damp enough to make growing easy.  But it didn't rain very much in the Fertile Crescent, and father away from the shores, the land was dry for much of the year.  So the farmers learned to dig canals from the rivers out into their fields.   That way, even if it did not rain, they could bring water to their crops. 

CHANGE 3:
The following sentence was added to the end of paragraph 10 of the Revised Verion (paragraph 7 of the original).
The tower was 35 feet high--taller than a two story house!

CHANGE 4 (Endnotes)

Original
Note to Parent:  Nomads roamed through the Fertile Crescent c. 6000 BC/BCE.
 Revised 
Note to Parent:  Nomads roamed through the Fertile Crescent c. 7000 BC/BCE.  The stone wall at Jericho dates to around 6800 BC/BCE. 

 Chapter 2 - Section 1:  Two Kingdoms Become One

Original - In Paragraph  5

...The Egyptians who lived in the Nile delta were called the "Lower Egyptians," and they were ruled by a king who wore a red crown.  The Egyptians who lived along the straight part of the river were called the "Upper Egyptians."  They were ruled by a king who wore a white crown.  The White Crown King and the Red Crown King fought with each other, and the Upper Egyptians and the Lower Egyptians sailed up and down the Nile and fought with each other too.

Revised - In Paragrph 5 -8

...The Egyptians who lived in the North, in the Nile Delta, were called the "Lower Egyptians." The Egyptians who lived along the straight part of the river, further south, were called the "Upper Egyptians."

When you look at a map, "north" is usually at the top and "south" is usually at the bottom.  So it might seem to you that the Nile Delta should be "Upper Egypt."  After all, it's on the upper part of your map.

But the ancient Egyptians didn't think about the world in that way.  The Nile River flowed from the mountains in the south, down to the delta in the north.  So the ancient Egyptians thought about the southern part of their country, Upper Egypt, as "up the river," and the northern part, Lower Egypt, as "down the river."  If you turn the map at the top of this page upside down, you'll see the world as the Egyptians did.

The Lower Egyptians were ruled by a king who wore a red crown, and the Upper Egyptians were ruled by a king who wore a white crown.  Both kings wanted to rule over all of Egypt.  So for years, the White Crown King and the Red Crown King fought with each other, and the Upper Egyptians and the Lower Egyptians sailed up and down the Nile and fought with each other too.


Chapter 3:  The First Writing

CHANGE 1:

Original - Paragraph 5

Because the Sumerians lived between two rivers, they had plenty of damp clay.  And instead of carving their pictures onto stone, they would mold this clay into a square tablet.  Then, while the clay was still wet, they would use a sharp knife or stick to carve their own picture-writing into the tablet.  After the message was carved into the clay, the Sumerians would bake the clay until it was hard.  The Sumerian picture-writing was called cuneiform.

Revised - Paragraph 8

The Sumerian picture-writing was called cuneiform.  Because the Sumerians lived between two rivers, they had plenty of damp clay.  Instead of carving their pictures onto stone, they would mold this clay into a square tablet.  Then, while the clay was still wet, they would use a sharp knife or stick to make the cuneiform marks.  After the message was carved into the clay, the Sumerians could either wipe it out and write another message (if the message were something unimportant, like a grocery list), or else bake the clay until it was hard.  Then the message would last for a very long time.

CHANGE 2:
The following section, which I've bolded,  was added to the end of the last sentence of paragraph 9 of the Revised Version (paragraph 6 of the original).

...you need a whole lot of space--whole buildings full of rooms for even a small library.


Chapter 4 - Part 1:  Making Mummies

Between Paragraphs 1 - 2  some dates were added as well as a long explanation of BC/BCE AD/CE dating structures.


Chapter 5
No substantive text changes.

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